Caffeine: coffee vs tea, facts of   Caffeine
Coffee-vs-Tea-2020

Caffeine: coffee vs tea, facts of Caffeine

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Caffeine is a stimulant of the central nervous system and is caffeine is a stimulant of the central nervous system and is classified as a methylxanthine

We all know that caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant and that it has effects on your brain. Caffeine targets many parts of your brain, including the cerebral cortex, the region of the brain devoted to memory, consciousness and language.

Now you’re talking around 250 to 300 milligrams of caffeine. At that point, caffeine acts as a short term diuretic. It stimulates your urine output, which is a nice way of saying it makes you happy like a racehorse. caffeine can do other bad things. You’ve probably heard of the coffee jitters. Those are real. It’s bad enough if you’re a mentally healthy individual with no anxiety issues. But if you suffer from anxiety, caffeine can absolutely make your condition worse. 

 We’re talking about caffeine’s biological Half-Life. That’s the time it takes for half of a substance to disappear in a healthy adult. That’s about six hours. However, smoking, birth control and some anti-depressants can extend that Half-Life to several days. 

But…

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Coffee and Tea:☕ What’s Better For Your Health. Even if the sun is out, fog and rain still smother your sleepy soul or not. Maybe you’re more of a morning person, but it’s an obvious fact that many of us do need some coffee or tea to prepare us for work or school, coffee, and tea, or some of the most widely consumed beverages on the planet.

 But how does caffeine affect your body and mind throughout the day? And is it bad for you or addictive? If you want to see the richest brew up, some more science facts for you. Don’t forget to share this article. Subscribe in our newsletters so that you never miss out on our news.

Caffeine is a stimulant of the central nervous system and is caffeine is a stimulant of the central nervous system and is classified as a methylxanthine.

Methylxanthines are a subclass of a class of chemicals called Xanthe the metal part of its name tells you that it includes a compound similar to methane called a methyl group xanthines are very common in many organisms including the tissues of a human. So it’s no surprise. that coffee and tea, two different plants that are only distantly related, developed the ability to synthesize caffeine.

But why would they do that?

Well, like all plants, coffee and tea have to deal with insects that want to eat their leaves and fruit so their leaves and seeds produce caffeine. Juvenile coffee plants in particular also leach caffeine into the surrounding soil. They do this to stop the growth of other plants nearby. That way, there’s less competition. Meanwhile, tea plants produce caffeine in two places.

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Cellular vacuoles, which are a type of organelle containing organic compounds and around the vascular bundles which are like the veins and arteries of a plant. The first is thought to discourage plant-eating animals from munching the leaves. And the second is thought to fight off fungi that also want to bite.

Other plants, like colonies, contain caffeine as well. Around 60 plant species produce this stuff. By now, you must be tempted to spit out your latte in disgust. Who wants to drink insecticide even if it comes from a plant? Don’t worry.

 The chemical is only lethal for bugs because bugs are much smaller plants. He has caffeine to induce the effects we associate with a caffeine buzz. But they’re applying it to a tiny organism that just can’t take it. The lethal dosage for a human being is about 75 to 100 cups in a day for a 154-pound adult. 

Caffeine’s L.D. 50. The dosage at which half of a mad scientist unlucky test victims fatally overdosed is about 150 to 200 milligrams for every two-point two pounds in an adult’s body. There’s no way you’re getting that much caffeine inside of you. Even the most ridiculous energy sports drink has no more than about 300 milligrams of caffeine in total

what are those effects? How does caffeine stimulate you?

Caffeine: coffee vs tea, facts of Caffeine

We all know that caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant and that it has effects on your brain. Caffeine targets many parts of your brain, including the cerebral cortex, the region of the brain devoted to memory, consciousness and language.

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 That might explain why you’re a little more articulate and aware. After a glass or mug of your favourite caffeinated beverage. But more generally and more importantly, it eliminates drowsiness, that drowsiness that you want to eliminate.

 With coffee goes away when caffeine binds to the adenosine receptors, which prevents adenosine from working. And that makes way for the brain’s natural stimulants. But caffeine also stimulates the medulla oblongata, the upper part of your brain stem.

 That part of your brain controls vital involuntary functions like the beating of your heart. Breathing, vomiting and the dilation and contraction of major blood vessels. That’s why a strong cup of coffee and tea also raises your heart rate and increases blood flow or restricts it. See, that’s where things get a little complicated.

 One of the ways caffeine works is by inhibiting a cellular enzyme called phosphide diasporas and phosphor. Diaspora’s is how your body puts the brakes on your cell’s favourite party drug cyclic adenosine, monophosphate or camp. Camp promotes activity in your cells. So when caffeine blocks at phosphide diaster diaspora’s your cells go into overdrive.

 Thing is, overdrive is a relative term since your different cells serve different functions. When caffeine binds with the cells that make up your blood vessels, the overload of camp causes those vessels to dilate. Which is why coffee can have different physical effects depending on the dosage or the individual drinking it. It will definitely make you think and talk faster, but it may or may not raise or lower your heart rate. 

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That is at normal doses. We should probably start talking about higher doses. The doses that won’t kill you, but might give you some unwanted side effects. One unpleasant side effect, caffeine fans know, is that it can give you a vicious need to go to the bathroom at normal doses like those you find in a single cup of coffee or a few cups of tea. This won’t happen so fast.

What if you have two to three cups of tea or more

Now you’re talking around 250 to 300 milligrams of caffeine. At that point, caffeine acts as a short term diuretic. It stimulates your urine output, which is a nice way of saying it makes you happy like a racehorse. caffeine can do other bad things. You’ve probably heard of the coffee jitters. Those are real. It’s bad enough if you’re a mentally healthy individual with no anxiety issues. But if you suffer from anxiety, caffeine can absolutely make your condition worse. 

Of course, if you’re watching this and have anxiety, we recommend you talk to your doctor about drinking caffeine before you toss out all of your coffee and tea. But one of the most burning questions people have about caffeine is whether or not it’s addictive. Well, not exactly. Remember those adenosine receptors? If you drink coffee or tea every day, your brain can sense that those receptors are getting blocked by caffeine.

 After a while, it will make more adenosine receptors to compensate. And as we’ve already discussed, those receptors induce drowsiness when adenosine binds to them. So if you skip your daily caffeine for the first time in forever, you’ll be more drowsy than normal. And there are other withdrawal effects of caffeine, headaches, irritability, etc..

But the important point here is that caffeine, although it is a stimulant, doesn’t work like other stimulants. Stimulants like illicit substances and amphetamines work by blocking dopamine transporters. These transporters remove the neurotransmitter dopamine from your synapses. But illicit substances don’t block dopamine receptors.

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 So when illicit substances or amphetamines block those transporters, dopamine accumulates in the skin apps. Dopamine is highly implicated in the reward system in your brain. This system trains your brain to learn that certain actions will pay off with the desired effect. Illicit substances and amphetamines.

 Therefore, trick your brain into thinking it’s always accomplishing something. The brain then rewards itself with a sense of euphoria and success. And just as your brain will increase adenosine receptors to try to outfox caffeine, your brain will also reduce dopamine receptors.

 If you do too many stimulants, that’s why illicit substances are so addictive. With so little dopamine, your body and brain cry out because they need that accomplishment feeling. It feels like some action vital to survival is needed. And so you feel like you need it.

Caffeine withdrawal doesn’t tell your brain you need caffeine in exactly the same way. It just tells you it’s tired. And if it’s a lazy Sunday afternoon and you have nothing to do. Most people are fine with that. You may like being picked up by caffeine, but you can do without it. There are many more specific effects. Caffeine has on our bodies and brain. And it would take forever to get through all of them. But there’s one we really can’t skip. That’s caffeine’s halflife.

Caffeine isn't radioactive.

 We’re talking about caffeine’s biological Half-Life. That’s the time it takes for half of a substance to disappear in a healthy adult. That’s about six hours. However, smoking, birth control and some anti-depressants can extend that Half-Life to several days. 

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But even after half of the caffeine is metabolized or removed, the other half is still there. And while it may have stopped keeping you alert and awake, it can still impact the quality of your sleep. So let’s assume you have an average physiology and body weight. You don’t smoke, take birth control or anti-depressants. If you have coffee at eight a.m., 25 % will remain.

 By 8:00 p.m., if you drink it in the afternoon, it might still be at half strength by bedtime. And if it isn’t enough to keep you up, it can limit the time you spend in REM sleep. REM sleep or rapid eye movement is the stuff of dreams. It’s when our brains reorganize our thoughts to prepare our minds for the coming days ahead.

Depriving yourself of REM sleep can lead to irritability and a sense that you didn’t rest at all the previous night. You feel tired and you end up needing more caffeine to get through the day. That’s why experts recommend that you limit caffeine intake to the mornings. They suggest a cutoff time of two p.m. for most adults.

 What does this all mean for you? Your morning and your coffee maker or tea thought? By now, you should be pretty confident that caffeine isn’t fatal unless you drink an impossible amount. You can’t get addicted to it like other stimulants. At worst, it makes you a little dependent. It makes you go to the bathroom a lot. If you drink more than a few cups and well, that’s it.

So if you’re caffeine-free and wanted to send this article to a friend who drinks coffee in the morning and hopes that they’d quit, the most you can tell them is to have a 2:00 p.m. cutoff time. Otherwise, let the rest of us have some coffee and tea in the morning.

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 Well, that’s all we have for caffeine’s effects on the human brain and body. What do you think? Do you think you’re a caffeine addict or have you sworn off coffee for one reason or another? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below. Thank you so much for reading And don’t forget to subscribe for more incredible articles daily.

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This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. ปั้มไลค์

    Like!! I blog frequently and I really thank you for your content. The article has truly peaked my interest.

    1. qshoura

      thank you so much I’m trying to do my best

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